Air Quality Index

What is CO2?

Carbon Dioxide or CO2 is a greenhouse gas that is natural and harmless in small quantities but as levels rise it can be dangerous to your health. Most commonly produced by the air we exhale, CO2 levels concentrate indoors with less ventilation. It is one of the most important gases on the earth because plants use it to produce carbohydrates in a process called photosynthesis. 350-1,000 ppm concentrations are typical of occupied indoor spaces with good air exchange.

WHO HCHO

Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most important carcinogen in outdoor air. The World Health Organisation guideline for indoor air formaldehyde (HCHO) concentration is 0.10 mg/m3. The California Air Resources Board recommends an “action level” of 0.10 mg/m3 and a “target level” of 0.05 mg/m3 or lower for homes. Average concentrations in older houses with UFFI are generally well below 0.10 mg/m3.

What are TVOCs?

TVOCs stands for Total Volatile Organic Compounds, which are the total amount of any emitted gases with short or long-term health effects. TVOCs can cause serious health effects in both the short and long term. Health effects vary from minor eye, nose and throat irritations all the way to liver and kidney damage or cancer, depending on the level of exposure. Action level of 0.50 mg/m3.

Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2)

The effort to reduce NO2 also needs to be targeted on the sources that make the biggest contribution to the problem: road vehicles contribute about 80% of NO2 pollution at the roadside and growth in the number of diesel cars has exacerbated this problem. The law states that hourly levels of NO2 must not breach 200 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3) more than 18 times in a whole year. This limit is regularly broken in London.

Guidline for indoor air formaldehyde (HCHO) concentration is 0.08 ppm (0.1mg/m3). The California Air Resources Board recommends an “action level” of 0.1 ppm and a “target level” of 0.05 ppm or lower for homes. ... Average concentrations in older houses with UFFI are generally well below 0.1 ppm. The World Health Organization

PM2.5

Guideline is 0-35 ug/m3 for particulate matter (PM) the term used to describe condensed phase (solid or liquid) particles suspended in the atmosphere. Their potential for causing health problems is directly linked to the size of the particles. A growing body of research has pointed towards the smaller particles, in particular PM less than 2.5 µm in diameter (PM2.5), as a metric more closely associated with adverse health effects than other metrics such as PM10 (particles with a diameter less than 10 µm). Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the UK.

Air Quality Index (AQI)

Air Quality Index (AQI) is a number used by government agencies [1] to communicate to the public how polluted the air currently is or how polluted it is forecast to become.[2][3] As the AQI increases, an increasingly large percentage of the population is likely to experience increasingly severe adverse health effects.

Different countries have their own air quality indices, corresponding to different national air quality standards. Some of these are the Air Quality Health Index (Canada), the Air Pollution Index (Malaysia), and the Pollutant Standards Index (Singapore).

WHO's First Global Conference on Air Pollution and Health. The first Global Conference on Air Pollution and Health will be held at WHO Headquarters in Geneva on 30 October - 1 November 2018. ... Affordable strategies exist to reduce key pollution emissions from the transport, energy, agriculture, waste and housing sectors.

THIS OUTSTANDING PRESENTATION was given by Dr Kumar at the First WHO Global Conference on Air Pollution and Health, on 1 November 2018.

Click here or the image for the 24 Power Point Slides. Video of the live presentation can be see on the WHO Website. Scroll to the end of the videos and go back 5 entries.